Allen Sleighs
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Kimball Cutter - A

The Kimball Cutter was the first sleigh of the 'cutter' style to be built. Starting in 1839. Peter Kimball of Maine built them. The sleigh was attractive, plain in design with a straight back and curved front (dasher), compact, light weight, practical, popular and inexpensive. It would accommodate two passengers and was easily pulled by a single horse. This sleigh became the prototype for all future cutter designs. The cutter style of sleigh has the distinction of being the most popular sleigh style in the United States.

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Portland Cutter - B

The Portland Cutter, originally built in Portland, Maine, was adapted from the Kimball Cutter. It featured a more modern design that included a curved back for greater comfort and a more pronounced curve in the front (dasher). The sleigh box was usually larger than the Kimball and provided more leg room. As with the Kimball, it became a popular design
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Canandaigua Cutter - C

This unique sleigh was found in upstate New York (Canandaigua) and is believed to have been built in the mid 1800's. The actual builder is unknown. This sleigh features a curved back and a winged dasher. The winged dasher shielded the driver from snow and cold. The brass rod found on the sleigh helps to strengthen the runner system which took a beating from bumpy rutted roads. The runners have one curve which attaches to the center of the dasher. This sleigh would accommodate two passengers and was pulled by a single horse.

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Russell Cutter - D

This sleigh is a Portland Cutter built by Joseph Russell in Maine. It features a contemporary set of lines on the sleigh box. The design is plain with a very angular straight back. Compared to other cutters the dasher of the Russell Cutter is almost vertical. Two short brass rods on each side of the sleigh box simulate reinforcing of the runner system. This sleigh, like all other cutters, was pulled by a single horse and would accommodate two passengers.

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Gentleman's Cutter - E

This sleigh was built for gentlemen to race. It was designed for speed and was very light in weight. The sleigh box which was high off the ground featured an 'S' shaped back and a very distinct curved dasher. The height of the sleigh box tended to make the sleigh top heavy and made driving a challenge. The lines of the sleigh demonstrated an aerodynamic style. The severe curve of the dasher kept snow and dirt kicked up by the horse from splattering the driver. This sleigh was built by S. R. Bailey from Amesbury, Massachusetts.

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Victorian Child's Sleigh - F

This sleigh from the mid l800's was taken from original sleigh plans. The lines demonstrate the Victorian Era. The high back gives support to the child. The sides sloping from high to low, front to back, protect the child from wind, cold and snow and allow easy access to the child. The unusual pivoting handle is simple, functional and comfortable to pull. Sleigh runners are low to the ground.

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Work Sled (Sap Sled) - G

These sleds were made of heavy timber by local craftsmen and farmers. They were low to the ground and had no driving seat. A rear lift panel allowed for easy loading and unloading. Step side rails and reinforcing rods ran parallel to the sleigh box. The runner system (bob runners) was designed with independent front and back runners for maneuverability. Usually this sleigh was pulled by a team of work horses.

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Doll Sleigh  - H

This sleigh is a cutter design that is suitable for large dolls or stuffed animals. The runners are oak and the box pine. A removable seat allows for complete utilization of the sleigh box. Many people use these as a focal point of room decoration. The box is painted and the runners and seat stained with a clear finish. These sleigh are to be used for decorative purposes only.
Not For Personal Use

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Piano Box Sleigh (circa early 1800's) - I

This sleigh derives its name from re-cycling shipping boxes for upright pianos and converting them into sleigh boxes. Because of its many uses, the sleigh design remained the same for over two hundred years. It was utilized for work, pleasure and church. All seats were adjustable and removable as they are in my sleigh. This sleigh, which shows simplicity in design, was built and used by Quakers on Long Island. Sleigh length is 18" to 20".


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Surrey Sleigh  (circa 1880's) - J

The design of this four passenger sleigh is unique. The lines of the body are flowing with high seat backs for comfort and protection from the elements. Because of its size, the sleigh would be pulled by a team of light horses. My reproduction features removable seats and a front seat section for better utilization of the sleigh box area. Sleigh length is 21".


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